hello. my name is mike ambs.

Aug 22

via Liam Young out on a container ship expedition with Unknown Fields. Follow along on #ufd2014
Liam young and Kate Davies are currently onboard a cargo ship travelling through the South China seas with on thier latest  Unknown Fields expedition.

via Liam Young out on a container ship expedition with Unknown Fields. Follow along on #ufd2014

Liam young and Kate Davies are currently onboard a cargo ship travelling through the South China seas with on thier latest  Unknown Fields expedition.

via The Living Cube by Till Könneker saves space in micro apartments
This space-efficient box by German designer Till Könneker creates a separate sleeping area and compact storage solutions for studio apartments (+ slideshow).

via The Living Cube by Till Könneker saves space in micro apartments

This space-efficient box by German designer Till Könneker creates a separate sleeping area and compact storage solutions for studio apartments (+ slideshow).

Aug 21

hitrecord:

“Bokeh Highway”

hitrecord:

Bokeh Highway

photo by Mike Ambs
I’d like our future home to have a backyard full of these trees… I enjoy them :)

photo by Mike Ambs

I’d like our future home to have a backyard full of these trees… I enjoy them :)

Aug 20

[video]

photo by Mike Ambs
Xander found Erica this special peacock feather for our 7 year anniversary :)

photo by Mike Ambs

Xander found Erica this special peacock feather for our 7 year anniversary :)

Aug 19

[video]

photo by Mike Ambs
Getting lost in Griffith Park with these two *

photo by Mike Ambs

Getting lost in Griffith Park with these two *

Aug 18

[video]

via Read Martin Scorsese’s passionate defense of Kodak film
On the heels of Kodak’s decision to continue its production of film stock after finalizing a deal with major Hollywood studios just last week, the venerable Martin Scorsese issued a heartfelt statement in support of the move, writing: “This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the a

via Read Martin Scorsese’s passionate defense of Kodak film

On the heels of Kodak’s decision to continue its production of film stock after finalizing a deal with major Hollywood studios just last week, the venerable Martin Scorsese issued a heartfelt statement in support of the move, writing: “This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the a

Aug 17

photo by Mike Ambs
Reflection…

photo by Mike Ambs

Reflection…

photo by Mike Ambs
Maeby needs a new toupee…

photo by Mike Ambs

Maeby needs a new toupee…

Aug 16

[video]


Nasa is a major player in space science, so when a team from the agency this week presents evidence that ”impossible” microwave thrusters seem to work, something strange is definitely going on. Either the results are completely wrong, or Nasa has confirmed a major breakthrough in space propulsion.
British scientist Roger Shawyer has been trying to interest people in his EmDrive for some years through his company SPR Ltd. Shawyer claims the EmDrive converts electric power into thrust, without the need for any propellant by bouncing microwaves around in a closed container. He has built a number of demonstration systems, but critics reject his relativity-based theory and insist that, according to the law of conservation of momentum, it cannot work.
According to good scientific practice, an independent third party needed to replicate Shawyer’s results. As Wired.co.uk reported, this happened last year when a Chinese team built its own EmDrive and confirmed that it produced 720 mN (about 72 grams) of thrust, enough for a practical satellite thruster. Such a thruster could be powered by solar electricity, eliminating the need for the supply of propellant that occupies up to half the launch mass of many satellites. The Chinese work attracted little attention; it seems that nobody in the West believed in it.
However, a US scientist, Guido Fetta, has built his own propellant-less microwave thruster, and managed to persuade Nasa to test it out. The test results were presentedon July 30 at the 50th Joint Propulsion Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Astonishingly enough, they are positive.
The Nasa team based at the Johnson Space Centre gave its paper the title “Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF [radio frequency] Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum”. The five researchers spent six days setting up test equipment followed by two days of experiments with various configurations. These tests included using a “null drive” similar to the live version but modified so it would not work, and using a device which would produce the same load on the apparatus to establish whether the effect might be produced by some effect unrelated to the actual drive. They also turned the drive around the other way to check whether that had any effect.

Nasa is a major player in space science, so when a team from the agency this week presents evidence that ”impossible” microwave thrusters seem to work, something strange is definitely going on. Either the results are completely wrong, or Nasa has confirmed a major breakthrough in space propulsion.

British scientist Roger Shawyer has been trying to interest people in his EmDrive for some years through his company SPR Ltd. Shawyer claims the EmDrive converts electric power into thrust, without the need for any propellant by bouncing microwaves around in a closed container. He has built a number of demonstration systems, but critics reject his relativity-based theory and insist that, according to the law of conservation of momentum, it cannot work.

According to good scientific practice, an independent third party needed to replicate Shawyer’s results. As Wired.co.uk reported, this happened last year when a Chinese team built its own EmDrive and confirmed that it produced 720 mN (about 72 grams) of thrust, enough for a practical satellite thruster. Such a thruster could be powered by solar electricity, eliminating the need for the supply of propellant that occupies up to half the launch mass of many satellites. The Chinese work attracted little attention; it seems that nobody in the West believed in it.

However, a US scientist, Guido Fetta, has built his own propellant-less microwave thruster, and managed to persuade Nasa to test it out. The test results were presentedon July 30 at the 50th Joint Propulsion Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Astonishingly enough, they are positive.

The Nasa team based at the Johnson Space Centre gave its paper the title “Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF [radio frequency] Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum”. The five researchers spent six days setting up test equipment followed by two days of experiments with various configurations. These tests included using a “null drive” similar to the live version but modified so it would not work, and using a device which would produce the same load on the apparatus to establish whether the effect might be produced by some effect unrelated to the actual drive. They also turned the drive around the other way to check whether that had any effect.

Aug 15

photo by bartekd via instagram

Day 8 - This is what is causing traffic jams in Yellowstone

photo by bartekd via instagram

Day 8 - This is what is causing traffic jams in Yellowstone

(Source: thingsilikeon)